Texas

Fort Davis, Texas

We awoke to a forecast of rain and high winds so we knew if we were going to do anything outside we had to get moving quickly. Our first stop was Fort Davis. It wasn’t raining yet so we decided to go on in. There is a museum plus a video but we wisely decided that we needed to view the restored buildings at the fort first because the rain was surely coming.

The Fort has been wonderfully restored with several buildings full of memorabilia. From the National Park website “A key post in the defense system of western Texas, Fort Davis played a major role in the history of the Southwest. From 1854 until 1891, troops stationed at the post protected emigrants, freighters, mail coaches, and travelers on the San Antonio-El Paso Road hoping to reach the gold fields of California. Today, Fort Davis is considered one of the best remaining examples of a frontier military post in the American Southwest.”

Commisary
Commisary
We gamely trooped around from building to building in the drizzling cold rain. The first building we went to was the commissary. We got to read entries from a diary belonging to a young lady and it was filled with daily activities and shed quite a light on the times.

The building that housed the information regarding the health and welfare of the residents was grim reminder of how difficult life was during that time. Contrary to popular belief most deaths were caused by disease or illness rather than wounds from battle. One family lost seven children within two weeks from diphtheria. It was not unusual for children to die at a young age or for women to die in childbirth. The average age of a man was only 48.

In the museum
In the museum
Families sometimes filled the voids in their families by adopting other children. A former Hospital Steward adopted two Indian children who were found by the Rangers after a battle with the Apache. The buildings emphasized how very difficult life was during that time, not at all like it’s sometimes romanticized in Hollywood. We ended the tour with a video and a tour of the museum itself.

After touring the fort we headed for the town of Marfa. I wanted to see the town and we were hoping there might be a grocery store there. By the time we got there it was raining steadily so wandering around the town was out. We were able to get gas at $2.29 which was the cheapest we’ve seen it recently. Of course after we got it and rode another block we found it even cheaper!

Someone had recommended that we eat pizza at the Pizza Foundation so we made an effort to find it. They had also given us the phone number and said we would probably want to call ahead – we didn’t. We couldn’t find it so we instead looked for a grocery store and found one and were able to get most of the things on our list. Afterward we made another effort to find the pizza restaurant and we found it – in a renovated garage. Gee, what is it with us and renovated buildings? We went in and finally realized that we had to order at the counter. Jerry went up to order and then headed out calling me. It was going to take an hour to fix our pizza and there was hardly anyone there. Apparently a lot of people had already called in. We heard later that if you went in to order there might be 30-40 call-ins ahead of you! Must be some good pizza and I’m sorry that we didn’t get to try it.

We decided to return to the coach to eat lunch and have a lazy afternoon. The weather was awful, rainy, cold plus a wind advisory so a good afternoon to catch a nap.

Later in the afternoon we realized that it was not only raining but also sleeting and snowing, not much but enough to see it falling. The wind was terrible and the coach was rocking so badly that we pulled in two of the slides. Looks like it’s going to be a rocky night!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s